+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2
 
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,048

    Sheriff candidates duke it out over tax breaks for felons

    From SFGate.com

    Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi’s two chief rivals in the sheriff’s race wasted no time excoriating his proposal to give tax breaks to San Francisco businesses that hire felons.

    “It is sad irony that the supervisor’s proposal puts victimizers before victims when it comes to incentivizing job creation,” said Chris Cunnie, a retired police officer and police union president who once served as undersheriff under Michal Hennessey, the eight-term sheriff who is retiring.

    Cunnie is locked in a tight race to succeed Hennessey with Mirkarimi and Capt. Paul Miyamoto, a 15-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Department.

    “What politician Ross Mirkarimi is proposing via legislation is not fair treatment but special treatment,” Miyamoto said.

    “If sincere,” he added, “his ideas are unfair to hard-working, law-abiding residents of San Francisco, and would needlessly coddle at-risk individuals whom we in the (Sheriff’s) Department are trying to teach more responsible behavior.”

    Mirkarimi’s response: “Typical right-wing response from my opponents. With a 65 percent recidivism rate in San Francisco, anyone who can’t see this as a crime-prevention strategy has his head in the sand.”

    The legislation that Mirkarimi introduced this week would give companies a $10,000 payroll tax credit for every new person hired who has a past felony conviction. Participation would be voluntary.

    The idea — already on the books in Philadelphia and a handful of states — is to give employers a financial incentive to hire felons, a group with a much higher unemployment rate than those without a criminal past. The federal government also provides similar tax incentives.

    Studies have shown that offenders are less likely to commit crime again if they have a job, but employers often are reluctant to make the hires, even when the tax breaks have been offered. Hennessey, who had endorsed Mirkarimi in the Nov. 8 election, backs his pick’s proposal.

  2. #2
    Junior Member LEO Affairs Recruit
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    5

    Personal tax advisor near me

    Quote Originally Posted by NewsHound View Post
    From SFGate.com

    From SFGate.com

    Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi’s two chief rivals in the sheriff’s race wasted no time excoriating his proposal to give tax breaks to San Francisco businesses that hire felons. Personal tax advisor near me - Virginia.

    “It is sad irony that the supervisor’s proposal puts victimizers before victims when it comes to incentivizing job creation,” said Chris Cunnie, a retired police officer and police union president who once served as undersheriff under Michal Hennessey, the eight-term sheriff who is retiring.

    Cunnie is locked in a tight race to succeed Hennessey with Mirkarimi and Capt. Paul Miyamoto, a 15-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Department.

    “What politician Ross Mirkarimi is proposing via legislation is not fair treatment but special treatment,” Miyamoto said.

    “If sincere,” he added, “his ideas are unfair to hard-working, law-abiding residents of San Francisco, and would needlessly coddle at-risk individuals whom we in the (Sheriff’s) Department are trying to teach more responsible behavior.”

    Mirkarimi’s response: “Typical right-wing response from my opponents. With a 65 percent recidivism rate in San Francisco, anyone who can’t see this as a crime-prevention strategy has his head in the sand.”

    The legislation that Mirkarimi introduced this week would give companies a $10,000 payroll tax credit for every new person hired who has a past felony conviction. Participation would be voluntary.

    The idea — already on the books in Philadelphia and a handful of states — is to give employers a financial incentive to hire felons, a group with a much higher unemployment rate than those without a criminal past. The federal government also provides similar tax incentives.

    Studies have shown that offenders are less likely to commit crime again if they have a job, but employers often are reluctant to make the hires, even when the tax breaks have been offered. Hennessey, who had endorsed Mirkarimi in the Nov. 8 election, backs his pick’s proposal.







    Yes, you're right. But a tax break is a good way to go.

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •