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  1. #1
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    Miami lifts suspension on controversial police capt after feds quietly end criminal p

    Miami lifts suspension on controversial police captain after feds quietly end criminal probe

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy

    A Miami police captain and former police union president suspended with pay last year after a string of racist comments and other controversies will soon start earning his paycheck again.

    But Javier Ortiz appears bound for desk duty — at least for the time being.

    The reinstatement comes two weeks after the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., quietly ended a previously undisclosed yearlong FBI investigation into Ortiz, with sources telling the Miami Herald that prosecutors decided there was not enough evidence to charge him for a series of questionable incidents, most involving excessive use-of-force allegations — even though the cases have cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil settlements.

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement had initiated the probe into Ortiz, who has accumulated dozens of public complaints over the years and forwarded it to the FBI. Neither law enforcement agency released a summary of the findings, but the Justice Department’s decision to close the probe was enough for the Miami police force to put him back to work. He was put on indefinite leave with pay in January 2020.

    “He’s no longer pending in a criminal investigation,” said Miami Deputy Police Chief Ron Papier, when asked why Ortiz had been cleared to return to work.

    Papier wouldn’t confirm what Ortiz will be doing but said he will be placed on some type of “administrative assignment.” The deputy chief also said it could be a few weeks before Ortiz begins his assignment because he must clear firearms training and and re-establish his Florida Department of Law Enforcement certification.

    A source aware of Ortiz’s return said he’ll likely be working in the agency’s records department where he will oversee all the electronic reports.

    Ortiz didn’t return a phone call or a text Monday night.

    Though it was not disclosed publicly, federal authorities had spent the past year investigating criminal allegations against Ortiz. Half a dozen people claimed he violated their civil rights by using excessive force during arrests or making unreasonable searches. The FBI’s corruption squad and the U.S. Attorney’s Office were building a case against Ortiz, believing he used his badge to break the law and deprived the alleged victims of their constitutional rights.

    The FBI and federal prosecutors in Miami ran it by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in Washington, which had final say, according to sources familiar with the probe. Justice Department officials, however, decided there was not enough evidence to charge Ortiz. The case was closed two weeks ago. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami declined to comment Monday.

    The probe centered around a series of incidents involving Ortiz when he worked both on- and off-duty jobs. Some of those incidents led to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements between the city of Miami and Ortiz’s alleged victims. In January, Miami city commissioners approved a $100,000 settlement with Melissa Lopez, who claimed Ortiz broke her wrist during an arrest at Art Basel in December 2017.

    The city had previously paid a settlement of $65,000 to Ruben Sebastian, who filed suit in 2016 claiming Ortiz and another officer illegally detained him during a traffic stop and arrested him for resisting an officer. The charges were eventually dropped, but Sebastian lost his job as a security guard for Miami-Dade County.

    In 2014, an insurer for Ultra Music Festival paid a $400,000 settlement to a New York man after Miami police working off-duty details allegedly beat him up outside the venue, according to a lawsuit. Jesse Campodonico was confronted by four cops, including Ortiz, when he complained that an Ultra security guard would not let his girlfriend into the festival with a glow stick in 2011.

    Campodonico claimed the cops struck him, choked him, and threw him to the ground, where they then shot him with a Taser three times. Campodonico, who accused Ortiz of fabricating a report to cover up the beating, sued the festival, city of Miami and the police officers. The insurer’s payment resolved the case against all of them.

    Campodonico was initially charged with battery, but those charges were eventually dropped.

    And in yet another lawsuit, Francois Alexandre claimed that Ortiz and other officers beat him up while he was celebrating the Miami Heat’s second straight NBA championship in front of AmericanAirlines Arena in June 2013. Ortiz allegedly placed Alexandre in a “headlock around the neck” and pushed him against a wall, according to court records.

    Ortiz prevailed in that case when a federal judge granted his motion for summary judgment.

    Ortiz — who had a penchant for making grating and offensive comments, some posted on social media over the years — sparked a firestorm at City Hall just before his January 2020 suspension during a back-and-forth with Keon Hardemon, now a Miami-Dade County commissioner, but back then the city’s only Black commissioner. Ortiz, who during the discussion referred to Black men as “negroes,” was explaining why he referred to himself as “Black” on his own promotion exam.

    When Ortiz brought up the “one-drop rule,” an old racist expression that implies anyone with any degree of Black ancestry is Black, Hardemon urged him not to get into a discussion on “degrees of Blackness.” Ortiz’s reply: “Oh no, you’re Blacker than me, that’s obvious.”

    Despite the outspoken comments, Ortiz managed to climb the ranks and become a SWAT leader. He also claimed a plum post in which he was in charge of giving out off-duty job assignments.

    It wasn’t the first time the captain was accused of racist behavior. Earlier on social media he had referred to Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland child who was shot dead by a cop as he played with a toy gun in a playground, as a “thug.” He bashed the city’s highest ranking female cop, a Muslim, for not covering her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Ortiz panicked city leaders in 2016 when he sent a missive to police departments across the country urging them not to work at Beyonce’s concerts because of a recent video she released in which Ortiz claimed she was paying homage to the Black Panther movement. He initially planned a boycott of her performance at Marlins Park, but it backfired when officers refused.

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy

  2. #2
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    Hey Kerr does this mean he’s not going to jail like you said.

  3. #3
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    Attorney buschell defended Roger stone politically connect lawyer to trump


    “Quietly ended investigation”. Just before trump left ironic, no?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Miami lifts suspension on controversial police captain after feds quietly end criminal probe

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy

    A Miami police captain and former police union president suspended with pay last year after a string of racist comments and other controversies will soon start earning his paycheck again.

    But Javier Ortiz appears bound for desk duty — at least for the time being.

    The reinstatement comes two weeks after the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., quietly ended a previously undisclosed yearlong FBI investigation into Ortiz, with sources telling the Miami Herald that prosecutors decided there was not enough evidence to charge him for a series of questionable incidents, most involving excessive use-of-force allegations — even though the cases have cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil settlements.

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement had initiated the probe into Ortiz, who has accumulated dozens of public complaints over the years and forwarded it to the FBI. Neither law enforcement agency released a summary of the findings, but the Justice Department’s decision to close the probe was enough for the Miami police force to put him back to work. He was put on indefinite leave with pay in January 2020.

    “He’s no longer pending in a criminal investigation,” said Miami Deputy Police Chief Ron Papier, when asked why Ortiz had been cleared to return to work.

    Papier wouldn’t confirm what Ortiz will be doing but said he will be placed on some type of “administrative assignment.” The deputy chief also said it could be a few weeks before Ortiz begins his assignment because he must clear firearms training and and re-establish his Florida Department of Law Enforcement certification.

    A source aware of Ortiz’s return said he’ll likely be working in the agency’s records department where he will oversee all the electronic reports.

    Ortiz didn’t return a phone call or a text Monday night.

    Though it was not disclosed publicly, federal authorities had spent the past year investigating criminal allegations against Ortiz. Half a dozen people claimed he violated their civil rights by using excessive force during arrests or making unreasonable searches. The FBI’s corruption squad and the U.S. Attorney’s Office were building a case against Ortiz, believing he used his badge to break the law and deprived the alleged victims of their constitutional rights.

    The FBI and federal prosecutors in Miami ran it by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in Washington, which had final say, according to sources familiar with the probe. Justice Department officials, however, decided there was not enough evidence to charge Ortiz. The case was closed two weeks ago. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami declined to comment Monday.

    The probe centered around a series of incidents involving Ortiz when he worked both on- and off-duty jobs. Some of those incidents led to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements between the city of Miami and Ortiz’s alleged victims. In January, Miami city commissioners approved a $100,000 settlement with Melissa Lopez, who claimed Ortiz broke her wrist during an arrest at Art Basel in December 2017.

    The city had previously paid a settlement of $65,000 to Ruben Sebastian, who filed suit in 2016 claiming Ortiz and another officer illegally detained him during a traffic stop and arrested him for resisting an officer. The charges were eventually dropped, but Sebastian lost his job as a security guard for Miami-Dade County.

    In 2014, an insurer for Ultra Music Festival paid a $400,000 settlement to a New York man after Miami police working off-duty details allegedly beat him up outside the venue, according to a lawsuit. Jesse Campodonico was confronted by four cops, including Ortiz, when he complained that an Ultra security guard would not let his girlfriend into the festival with a glow stick in 2011.

    Campodonico claimed the cops struck him, choked him, and threw him to the ground, where they then shot him with a Taser three times. Campodonico, who accused Ortiz of fabricating a report to cover up the beating, sued the festival, city of Miami and the police officers. The insurer’s payment resolved the case against all of them.

    Campodonico was initially charged with battery, but those charges were eventually dropped.

    And in yet another lawsuit, Francois Alexandre claimed that Ortiz and other officers beat him up while he was celebrating the Miami Heat’s second straight NBA championship in front of AmericanAirlines Arena in June 2013. Ortiz allegedly placed Alexandre in a “headlock around the neck” and pushed him against a wall, according to court records.

    Ortiz prevailed in that case when a federal judge granted his motion for summary judgment.

    Ortiz — who had a penchant for making grating and offensive comments, some posted on social media over the years — sparked a firestorm at City Hall just before his January 2020 suspension during a back-and-forth with Keon Hardemon, now a Miami-Dade County commissioner, but back then the city’s only Black commissioner. Ortiz, who during the discussion referred to Black men as “negroes,” was explaining why he referred to himself as “Black” on his own promotion exam.

    When Ortiz brought up the “one-drop rule,” an old racist expression that implies anyone with any degree of Black ancestry is Black, Hardemon urged him not to get into a discussion on “degrees of Blackness.” Ortiz’s reply: “Oh no, you’re Blacker than me, that’s obvious.”

    Despite the outspoken comments, Ortiz managed to climb the ranks and become a SWAT leader. He also claimed a plum post in which he was in charge of giving out off-duty job assignments.

    It wasn’t the first time the captain was accused of racist behavior. Earlier on social media he had referred to Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland child who was shot dead by a cop as he played with a toy gun in a playground, as a “thug.” He bashed the city’s highest ranking female cop, a Muslim, for not covering her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Ortiz panicked city leaders in 2016 when he sent a missive to police departments across the country urging them not to work at Beyonce’s concerts because of a recent video she released in which Ortiz claimed she was paying homage to the Black Panther movement. He initially planned a boycott of her performance at Marlins Park, but it backfired when officers refused.

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy
    Papo you are big time. I would say anyone coming in contact with him will win the lottery.

  5. #5
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    Javi Ortiz File even made it to Washington, DC. Wow❗

  6. #6
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    Charles Rabin Miami Herald Article on Capt Ortiz’s

    A Miami police captain and former police union president suspended with pay last year after a string of racist comments and other controversies will soon start earning his paycheck again.

    But Javier Ortiz appears bound for desk duty — at least for the time being.

    The reinstatement comes two weeks after the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., quietly ended a previously undisclosed yearlong FBI investigation into Ortiz, with sources telling the Miami Herald that prosecutors decided there was not enough evidence to charge him for a series of questionable incidents, most involving excessive use-of-force allegations — even though the cases have cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil settlements.

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement had initiated the probe into Ortiz, who has accumulated dozens of public complaints over the years and forwarded it to the FBI. Neither law enforcement agency released a summary of the findings, but the Justice Department’s decision to close the probe was enough for the Miami police force to put him back to work. He was put on indefinite leave with pay in January 2020.

    “He’s no longer pending in a criminal investigation,” said Miami Deputy Police Chief Ron Papier, when asked why Ortiz had been cleared to return to work.

    Papier wouldn’t confirm what Ortiz will be doing but said he will be placed on some type of “administrative assignment.” The deputy chief also said it could be a few weeks before Ortiz begins his assignment because he must clear firearms training and and re-establish his Florida Department of Law Enforcement certification.

    A source aware of Ortiz’s return said he’ll likely be working in the agency’s records department where he will oversee all the electronic reports.

    Ortiz didn’t return a phone call or a text Monday night.

    Though it was not disclosed publicly, federal authorities had spent the past year investigating criminal allegations against Ortiz. Half a dozen people claimed he violated their civil rights by using excessive force during arrests or making unreasonable searches. The FBI’s corruption squad and the U.S. Attorney’s Office were building a case against Ortiz, believing he used his badge to break the law and deprived the alleged victims of their constitutional rights.

    The FBI and federal prosecutors in Miami ran it by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in Washington, which had final say, according to sources familiar with the probe. Justice Department officials, however, decided there was not enough evidence to charge Ortiz. The case was closed two weeks ago. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami declined to comment Monday.

    The probe centered around a series of incidents involving Ortiz when he worked both on- and off-duty jobs. Some of those incidents led to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements between the city of Miami and Ortiz’s alleged victims. In January, Miami city commissioners approved a $100,000 settlement with Melissa Lopez, who claimed Ortiz broke her wrist during an arrest at Art Basel in December 2017.

    The city had previously paid a settlement of $65,000 to Ruben Sebastian, who filed suit in 2016 claiming Ortiz and another officer illegally detained him during a traffic stop and arrested him for resisting an officer. The charges were eventually dropped, but Sebastian lost his job as a security guard for Miami-Dade County.

    In 2014, an insurer for Ultra Music Festival paid a $400,000 settlement to a New York man after Miami police working off-duty details allegedly beat him up outside the venue, according to a lawsuit. Jesse Campodonico was confronted by four cops, including Ortiz, when he complained that an Ultra security guard would not let his girlfriend into the festival with a glow stick in 2011.

    Campodonico claimed the cops struck him, choked him, and threw him to the ground, where they then shot him with a Taser three times. Campodonico, who accused Ortiz of fabricating a report to cover up the beating, sued the festival, city of Miami and the police officers. The insurer’s payment resolved the case against all of them.

    Campodonico was initially charged with battery, but those charges were eventually dropped.

    And in yet another lawsuit, Francois Alexandre claimed that Ortiz and other officers beat him up while he was celebrating the Miami Heat’s second straight NBA championship in front of AmericanAirlines Arena in June 2013. Ortiz allegedly placed Alexandre in a “headlock around the neck” and pushed him against a wall, according to court records.

    Ortiz prevailed in that case when a federal judge granted his motion for summary judgment.

    Ortiz — who had a penchant for making grating and offensive comments, some posted on social media over the years — sparked a firestorm at City Hall just before his January 2020 suspension during a back-and-forth with Keon Hardemon, now a Miami-Dade County commissioner, but back then the city’s only Black commissioner. Ortiz, who during the discussion referred to Black men as “negroes,” was explaining why he referred to himself as “Black” on his own promotion exam.

    When Ortiz brought up the “one-drop rule,” an old racist expression that implies anyone with any degree of Black ancestry is Black, Hardemon urged him not to get into a discussion on “degrees of Blackness.” Ortiz’s reply: “Oh no, you’re Blacker than me, that’s obvious.”

    Despite the outspoken comments, Ortiz managed to climb the ranks and become a SWAT leader. He also claimed a plum post in which he was in charge of giving out off-duty job assignments.

    It wasn’t the first time the captain was accused of racist behavior. Earlier on social media he had referred to Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland child who was shot dead by a cop as he played with a toy gun in a playground, as a “thug.” He bashed the city’s highest ranking female cop, a Muslim, for not covering her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Ortiz panicked city leaders in 2016 when he sent a missive to police departments across the country urging them not to work at Beyonce’s concerts because of a recent video she released in which Ortiz claimed she was paying homage to the Black Panther movement. He initially planned a boycott of her performance at Marlins Park, but it backfired when officers refused.

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy

  7. #7
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    Guest
    This department is full of $hit!!!!

  8. #8
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    A Miami police captain and former police union president suspended with pay last year after a string of racist comments and other controversies will soon start earning his paycheck again.

    But Javier Ortiz appears bound for desk duty — at least for the time being.

    The reinstatement comes two weeks after the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., quietly ended a previously undisclosed yearlong FBI investigation into Ortiz, with sources telling the Miami Herald that prosecutors decided there was not enough evidence to charge him for a series of questionable incidents, most involving excessive use-of-force allegations — even though the cases have cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil settlements.

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement had initiated the probe into Ortiz, who has accumulated dozens of public complaints over the years and forwarded it to the FBI. Neither law enforcement agency released a summary of the findings, but the Justice Department’s decision to close the probe was enough for the Miami police force to put him back to work. He was put on indefinite leave with pay in January 2020.

    “He’s no longer pending in a criminal investigation,” said Miami Deputy Police Chief Ron Papier, when asked why Ortiz had been cleared to return to work.

    Papier wouldn’t confirm what Ortiz will be doing but said he will be placed on some type of “administrative assignment.” The deputy chief also said it could be a few weeks before Ortiz begins his assignment because he must clear firearms training and and re-establish his Florida Department of Law Enforcement certification.

    A source aware of Ortiz’s return said he’ll likely be working in the agency’s records department where he will oversee all the electronic reports.

    Ortiz didn’t return a phone call or a text Monday night.

    Though it was not disclosed publicly, federal authorities had spent the past year investigating criminal allegations against Ortiz. Half a dozen people claimed he violated their civil rights by using excessive force during arrests or making unreasonable searches. The FBI’s corruption squad and the U.S. Attorney’s Office were building a case against Ortiz, believing he used his badge to break the law and deprived the alleged victims of their constitutional rights.

    The FBI and federal prosecutors in Miami ran it by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in Washington, which had final say, according to sources familiar with the probe. Justice Department officials, however, decided there was not enough evidence to charge Ortiz. The case was closed two weeks ago. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami declined to comment Monday.

    The probe centered around a series of incidents involving Ortiz when he worked both on- and off-duty jobs. Some of those incidents led to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements between the city of Miami and Ortiz’s alleged victims. In January, Miami city commissioners approved a $100,000 settlement with Melissa Lopez, who claimed Ortiz broke her wrist during an arrest at Art Basel in December 2017.

    The city had previously paid a settlement of $65,000 to Ruben Sebastian, who filed suit in 2016 claiming Ortiz and another officer illegally detained him during a traffic stop and arrested him for resisting an officer. The charges were eventually dropped, but Sebastian lost his job as a security guard for Miami-Dade County.

    In 2014, an insurer for Ultra Music Festival paid a $400,000 settlement to a New York man after Miami police working off-duty details allegedly beat him up outside the venue, according to a lawsuit. Jesse Campodonico was confronted by four cops, including Ortiz, when he complained that an Ultra security guard would not let his girlfriend into the festival with a glow stick in 2011.

    Campodonico claimed the cops struck him, choked him, and threw him to the ground, where they then shot him with a Taser three times. Campodonico, who accused Ortiz of fabricating a report to cover up the beating, sued the festival, city of Miami and the police officers. The insurer’s payment resolved the case against all of them.

    Campodonico was initially charged with battery, but those charges were eventually dropped.

    And in yet another lawsuit, Francois Alexandre claimed that Ortiz and other officers beat him up while he was celebrating the Miami Heat’s second straight NBA championship in front of AmericanAirlines Arena in June 2013. Ortiz allegedly placed Alexandre in a “headlock around the neck” and pushed him against a wall, according to court records.

    Ortiz prevailed in that case when a federal judge granted his motion for summary judgment.

    Ortiz — who had a penchant for making grating and offensive comments, some posted on social media over the years — sparked a firestorm at City Hall just before his January 2020 suspension during a back-and-forth with Keon Hardemon, now a Miami-Dade County commissioner, but back then the city’s only Black commissioner. Ortiz, who during the discussion referred to Black men as “negroes,” was explaining why he referred to himself as “Black” on his own promotion exam.

    When Ortiz brought up the “one-drop rule,” an old racist expression that implies anyone with any degree of Black ancestry is Black, Hardemon urged him not to get into a discussion on “degrees of Blackness.” Ortiz’s reply: “Oh no, you’re Blacker than me, that’s obvious.”

    Despite the outspoken comments, Ortiz managed to climb the ranks and become a SWAT leader. He also claimed a plum post in which he was in charge of giving out off-duty job assignments.

    It wasn’t the first time the captain was accused of racist behavior. Earlier on social media he had referred to Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland child who was shot dead by a cop as he played with a toy gun in a playground, as a “thug.” He bashed the city’s highest ranking female cop, a Muslim, for not covering her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Ortiz panicked city leaders in 2016 when he sent a missive to police departments across the country urging them not to work at Beyonce’s concerts because of a recent video she released in which Ortiz claimed she was paying homage to the Black Panther movement. He initially planned a boycott of her performance at Marlins Park, but it backfired when officers refused.

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy
    This guys is incredible! Corruption at its best.

  9. #9
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Miami lifts suspension on controversial police captain after feds quietly end criminal probe

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy

    A Miami police captain and former police union president suspended with pay last year after a string of racist comments and other controversies will soon start earning his paycheck again.

    But Javier Ortiz appears bound for desk duty — at least for the time being.

    The reinstatement comes two weeks after the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., quietly ended a previously undisclosed yearlong FBI investigation into Ortiz, with sources telling the Miami Herald that prosecutors decided there was not enough evidence to charge him for a series of questionable incidents, most involving excessive use-of-force allegations — even though the cases have cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil settlements.

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement had initiated the probe into Ortiz, who has accumulated dozens of public complaints over the years and forwarded it to the FBI. Neither law enforcement agency released a summary of the findings, but the Justice Department’s decision to close the probe was enough for the Miami police force to put him back to work. He was put on indefinite leave with pay in January 2020.

    “He’s no longer pending in a criminal investigation,” said Miami Deputy Police Chief Ron Papier, when asked why Ortiz had been cleared to return to work.

    Papier wouldn’t confirm what Ortiz will be doing but said he will be placed on some type of “administrative assignment.” The deputy chief also said it could be a few weeks before Ortiz begins his assignment because he must clear firearms training and and re-establish his Florida Department of Law Enforcement certification.

    A source aware of Ortiz’s return said he’ll likely be working in the agency’s records department where he will oversee all the electronic reports.

    Ortiz didn’t return a phone call or a text Monday night.

    Though it was not disclosed publicly, federal authorities had spent the past year investigating criminal allegations against Ortiz. Half a dozen people claimed he violated their civil rights by using excessive force during arrests or making unreasonable searches. The FBI’s corruption squad and the U.S. Attorney’s Office were building a case against Ortiz, believing he used his badge to break the law and deprived the alleged victims of their constitutional rights.

    The FBI and federal prosecutors in Miami ran it by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in Washington, which had final say, according to sources familiar with the probe. Justice Department officials, however, decided there was not enough evidence to charge Ortiz. The case was closed two weeks ago. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami declined to comment Monday.

    The probe centered around a series of incidents involving Ortiz when he worked both on- and off-duty jobs. Some of those incidents led to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements between the city of Miami and Ortiz’s alleged victims. In January, Miami city commissioners approved a $100,000 settlement with Melissa Lopez, who claimed Ortiz broke her wrist during an arrest at Art Basel in December 2017.

    The city had previously paid a settlement of $65,000 to Ruben Sebastian, who filed suit in 2016 claiming Ortiz and another officer illegally detained him during a traffic stop and arrested him for resisting an officer. The charges were eventually dropped, but Sebastian lost his job as a security guard for Miami-Dade County.

    In 2014, an insurer for Ultra Music Festival paid a $400,000 settlement to a New York man after Miami police working off-duty details allegedly beat him up outside the venue, according to a lawsuit. Jesse Campodonico was confronted by four cops, including Ortiz, when he complained that an Ultra security guard would not let his girlfriend into the festival with a glow stick in 2011.

    Campodonico claimed the cops struck him, choked him, and threw him to the ground, where they then shot him with a Taser three times. Campodonico, who accused Ortiz of fabricating a report to cover up the beating, sued the festival, city of Miami and the police officers. The insurer’s payment resolved the case against all of them.

    Campodonico was initially charged with battery, but those charges were eventually dropped.

    And in yet another lawsuit, Francois Alexandre claimed that Ortiz and other officers beat him up while he was celebrating the Miami Heat’s second straight NBA championship in front of AmericanAirlines Arena in June 2013. Ortiz allegedly placed Alexandre in a “headlock around the neck” and pushed him against a wall, according to court records.

    Ortiz prevailed in that case when a federal judge granted his motion for summary judgment.

    Ortiz — who had a penchant for making grating and offensive comments, some posted on social media over the years — sparked a firestorm at City Hall just before his January 2020 suspension during a back-and-forth with Keon Hardemon, now a Miami-Dade County commissioner, but back then the city’s only Black commissioner. Ortiz, who during the discussion referred to Black men as “negroes,” was explaining why he referred to himself as “Black” on his own promotion exam.

    When Ortiz brought up the “one-drop rule,” an old racist expression that implies anyone with any degree of Black ancestry is Black, Hardemon urged him not to get into a discussion on “degrees of Blackness.” Ortiz’s reply: “Oh no, you’re Blacker than me, that’s obvious.”

    Despite the outspoken comments, Ortiz managed to climb the ranks and become a SWAT leader. He also claimed a plum post in which he was in charge of giving out off-duty job assignments.

    It wasn’t the first time the captain was accused of racist behavior. Earlier on social media he had referred to Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland child who was shot dead by a cop as he played with a toy gun in a playground, as a “thug.” He bashed the city’s highest ranking female cop, a Muslim, for not covering her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Ortiz panicked city leaders in 2016 when he sent a missive to police departments across the country urging them not to work at Beyonce’s concerts because of a recent video she released in which Ortiz claimed she was paying homage to the Black Panther movement. He initially planned a boycott of her performance at Marlins Park, but it backfired when officers refused.

    Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...#storylink=cpy
    This man is going to kill someone and then his going to try to cover it up.

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