+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
 
  1. #1
    Unregistered
    Guest

    2019 Leadership - Correcting Subordinates

    Correction Is Not Harassment

    Employees who are overly sensitive to criticism, necessary correction or even honest feedback are not a new phenomenon. They have long posed a challenge to well-meaning supervisors trying to correct unacceptable behavior or poor performance. But today the problem seems to be growing. Some overly sensitive employees feel they are being picked on, demeaned, harassed and even bullied, and some even complain to their supervisor's boss.

    Unfortunately, some supervisors do give feedback in a way that feels demeaning. Those supervisors should understand that such a leadership style is inappropriate and ineffective, and hurts employee trust, morale and job performance. Good supervisors know they can improve behavior and performance by providing corrective feedback without being demeaning.

    I could write a book about why some employees are overly sensitive about receiving corrective feedback. Suffice to say that we are products of our past, our upbringing and our collective experiences. Those who have been sheltered from receiving appropriate assertive correction may fail to see the importance or appropriateness of such feedback. These suggestions may help:
    Employees are individuals. Each employee may react differently to correction. To be most effective, tailor your feedback to the individual.
    Use empathy. Corrective feedback feels critical to most people - some more than others. There is no need to walk on eggshells, but understand how the individual feels to help you get better results.
    Frequent Feedback. Feedback should not be just critical. It should be positive as well as corrective. Feedback should be ongoing throughout the year.
    Clear expectations help. To reduce allegations of harassment meet with and discuss these and other expectations you may develop before you need to give corrective feedback to your subordinates:
    I will treat each shift member fairly and equally. I will work hard to create a work environment where you feel both comfortable and respected.

    It is my intention to maintain a high level of professionalism and performance on this shift, both to carry out our mission, and to help develop hard working individuals like you who will become our future leaders.

    To accomplish this, I will meet with you formerly and informally throughout the year to provide you with feedback regarding my perceptions on your work performance. I never want you to have to guess how I think you are doing.

    Good work deserves recognition, and unacceptable behavior deserves early attention so that mistakes do not become permanent habits.

    My efforts at early intervention should not be viewed as nit picking, discipline or harassment. Rather they are simply my desire to help improve future performance for the benefit of you, your coworkers and our mission.

    You will find that I am very approachable. I ask that if you have a conflict with me that you first approach me and we will try to resolve the conflict together. If after consulting with me you feel the need to go a step further, please remember to keep in mind our chain of command.


    TIP: Corrective feedback is an essential part of a supervisor's job. Letting subordinates know in advance that you will be providing continuous and respectful feedback may reduce their perception that they are being harassed.

  2. #2
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Correction Is Not Harassment

    Employees who are overly sensitive to criticism, necessary correction or even honest feedback are not a new phenomenon. They have long posed a challenge to well-meaning supervisors trying to correct unacceptable behavior or poor performance. But today the problem seems to be growing. Some overly sensitive employees feel they are being picked on, demeaned, harassed and even bullied, and some even complain to their supervisor's boss.

    Unfortunately, some supervisors do give feedback in a way that feels demeaning. Those supervisors should understand that such a leadership style is inappropriate and ineffective, and hurts employee trust, morale and job performance. Good supervisors know they can improve behavior and performance by providing corrective feedback without being demeaning.

    I could write a book about why some employees are overly sensitive about receiving corrective feedback. Suffice to say that we are products of our past, our upbringing and our collective experiences. Those who have been sheltered from receiving appropriate assertive correction may fail to see the importance or appropriateness of such feedback. These suggestions may help:
    Employees are individuals. Each employee may react differently to correction. To be most effective, tailor your feedback to the individual.
    Use empathy. Corrective feedback feels critical to most people - some more than others. There is no need to walk on eggshells, but understand how the individual feels to help you get better results.
    Frequent Feedback. Feedback should not be just critical. It should be positive as well as corrective. Feedback should be ongoing throughout the year.
    Clear expectations help. To reduce allegations of harassment meet with and discuss these and other expectations you may develop before you need to give corrective feedback to your subordinates:
    I will treat each shift member fairly and equally. I will work hard to create a work environment where you feel both comfortable and respected.

    It is my intention to maintain a high level of professionalism and performance on this shift, both to carry out our mission, and to help develop hard working individuals like you who will become our future leaders.

    To accomplish this, I will meet with you formerly and informally throughout the year to provide you with feedback regarding my perceptions on your work performance. I never want you to have to guess how I think you are doing.

    Good work deserves recognition, and unacceptable behavior deserves early attention so that mistakes do not become permanent habits.

    My efforts at early intervention should not be viewed as nit picking, discipline or harassment. Rather they are simply my desire to help improve future performance for the benefit of you, your coworkers and our mission.

    You will find that I am very approachable. I ask that if you have a conflict with me that you first approach me and we will try to resolve the conflict together. If after consulting with me you feel the need to go a step further, please remember to keep in mind our chain of command.


    TIP: Corrective feedback is an essential part of a supervisor's job. Letting subordinates know in advance that you will be providing continuous and respectful feedback may reduce their perception that they are being harassed.

    Sorry, but your asking to much of a supervisor. Most of the new ones don't have enough life experience, to deal with many different personality. Most before they began a conversation with you, Look to their stripes and make sure you notice them doing it, so as to intimidate you (or try to).

  3. #3
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Just cause someone passes an exam does not mean they know more than a subordinate. You have supervisors here that are literally retards. This job is common sense, even supervising. This is not the medicine field where a superior has a higher degree than you. How do you want me to accept constructive criticism from a moron with a GED and had been on the job for 3 or 4 years.

  4. #4
    Unregistered
    Guest
    I swear you guys are your own worst enemy. Police work has literally become PSA with a gun. Just do the reports and answer calls for service. Supervisors, you will not become someone by being a hardass and messing with your crew. Your sole purpose in life is to make sure your crew members are doing CALLS FOR SERVICE. Do not be proactive. Don’t do anything informal with me. We are not friends. I don’t like you, you don’t like me. We are here to work and make it home. I don’t care for compstat nor do I care for the chiefs mission. CALLS FOR SERVICE. Nothing more nothing less. I will only 15 when I’m dispatched. I WILL PLAY THE GAME this department wants me to play.

  5. #5
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Just cause someone passes an exam does not mean they know more than a subordinate. You have supervisors here that are literally retards. This job is common sense, even supervising. This is not the medicine field where a superior has a higher degree than you. How do you want me to accept constructive criticism from a moron with a GED and had been on the job for 3 or 4 years.
    Sgt. Frederick is one of many,not only Clueless but Nasty attitude to the max. Extremely Bi-polar one day hug and kisses next day walks pass you all serious and not a Hello. Then again is a woman, every woman has a crazy Switch. When the switch in ON walk away and run. Stay 500 ft away and you might survive that day.

    If you are due for an evaluation make sure the SWITCh in OFF otherwise your hard all year round work might go unnotice and just a simple Average will do.

    When on the Rag stay far away don’t be bothering either.

  6. #6
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Sgt. Frederick is one of many,not only Clueless but Nasty attitude to the max. Extremely Bi-polar one day hug and kisses next day walks pass you all serious and not a Hello. Then again is a woman, every woman has a crazy Switch. When the switch in ON walk away and run. Stay 500 ft away and you might survive that day.

    If you are due for an evaluation make sure the SWITCh in OFF otherwise your hard all year round work might go unnotice and just a simple Average will do.

    When on the Rag stay far away don’t be bothering either.
    You missed comment if they are going through menopause +/- 50 what does the switch do then?

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •