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  1. #1
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    Irma post storm response

    Who made the decision to shut down the Hurricane Deployment with Irma so fast. Within hours of sunset they had sent most people home. 2 days after it hits we still have over 100,000 people without power, over 40 major intersections without lights, roads blocked by trees, and people still in schools and they just sent everyone home like it's a normal day leaving the public on their own. This morning traffic was a complete disaster with people trying to get to work and few controlled intersections. I heard at night it's extremely dangerous due to no street lights. You can't any see the lights to know to stop. Just seems like a very dangerous decision.

  2. #2
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Buckhorn is responsible.

  3. #3
    Unregistered
    Guest
    This info might help you:

    TRAFFIC SIGNAL BLACKOUT—If all traffic signal lights are not working because of an electrical power failure, you must stop at the intersection and then proceed when you know other turning and approaching vehicles, bicycles, or pedestrians have stopped.

    Flashing Light Traffic Signals. Sometimes, you will come across a flashing red or yellow light on the road: A flashing red light means come to a complete stop, then proceed when you can. A flashing yellow light means proceed with caution.

    Some intersections were manned, some had generators running the lights, and some had nothing. This happened in Pasco County, Hillsborough County, in the City, and in many other places throughout Fl. The public can not expect that police officers will remain at intersection for an undetermined amount of time. TECO was doing the best they could to restore power.

    The public has the legal obligation to follow traffic laws in these types of situations, but they don't.

    As far as "You can't any see the lights to know to stop.", there are many roads in the state of Florida and elsewhere, that are extremely dark and you have to rely on your headlights/high beams. I have personally driven many of these roads, and have never had an issue with clearly seeing an intersection that is up ahead on the road.

    Again, the problem is that people don't want to follow the rules. I saw people getting into fights over who was in line first for gasoline and/or food, because there were very few places that were open. I can not even begin to imagine what would have happened if we would have been hit with a category 4 hurricane. It would have been horrible. Why? Not, because police, fire, electric companies, etc, were stretched thin and could not possibly address all the issues. But because people don't know how to act or follow the rules.

  4. #4
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    This info might help you:

    TRAFFIC SIGNAL BLACKOUT—If all traffic signal lights are not working because of an electrical power failure, you must stop at the intersection and then proceed when you know other turning and approaching vehicles, bicycles, or pedestrians have stopped.

    Flashing Light Traffic Signals. Sometimes, you will come across a flashing red or yellow light on the road: A flashing red light means come to a complete stop, then proceed when you can. A flashing yellow light means proceed with caution.

    Some intersections were manned, some had generators running the lights, and some had nothing. This happened in Pasco County, Hillsborough County, in the City, and in many other places throughout Fl. The public can not expect that police officers will remain at intersection for an undetermined amount of time. TECO was doing the best they could to restore power.

    The public has the legal obligation to follow traffic laws in these types of situations, but they don't.

    As far as "You can't any see the lights to know to stop.", there are many roads in the state of Florida and elsewhere, that are extremely dark and you have to rely on your headlights/high beams. I have personally driven many of these roads, and have never had an issue with clearly seeing an intersection that is up ahead on the road.

    Again, the problem is that people don't want to follow the rules. I saw people getting into fights over who was in line first for gasoline and/or food, because there were very few places that were open. I can not even begin to imagine what would have happened if we would have been hit with a category 4 hurricane. It would have been horrible. Why? Not, because police, fire, electric companies, etc, were stretched thin and could not possibly address all the issues. But because people don't know how to act or follow the rules.
    This post is absolutely brilliant. Period.

  5. #5
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Can you Police the city better if you are home, rested and relieved your family is ok?
    Or is it better to sleep on a mat and be holed up with your fellow officers who are walking around wearing hoochie mama shorts?
    The original post is from a pus*sy

  6. #6
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Can you Police the city better if you are home, rested and relieved your family is ok?
    Or is it better to sleep on a mat and be holed up with your fellow officers who are walking around wearing hoochie mama shorts?
    The original post is from a pus*sy
    No the original poster was dead on and asked a legitimate question. He/she most likely was one of the people stuck directing traffic during a 16 hour day shift and there were a lot of them. He/she probably saw all the people in hoochie shorts and flip flops going home after a rough night of lounging around RJS doing ABSOLUTELY FUKKING nothing for most of the deployment.

    Regardless of the bullzhit boilerplate emails from staff that are sure to come praising our readiness and performance this hurricane showed just how unorganized, unprepared and un FUKKING ethical some of our personnel are. I use the word personnel because it wasn't just officers but poor supervision and commanders as well. Some of you really shined from all levels top to bottom and trust me, people know who you are and greatly respect you. For you small lot Irma was a defining moment that let people know you perform under pressure and are willing to sacrifice to get things done. For the rest of you, hiding and dodging until you could cut out, you are a disgrace and just like the others you have also defined your career at TPD.

    The question asked was legit. Who gave the order to break down a full scale deployment the MORNING the hurricane hit and why? None of the damage to traffic signs and lights was even assessed yet and the radio was full of people going T7. While I agree with the above poster that the citizens have to follow the traffic laws that means absolutely nothing to those ALPHA units that were on at 0600 and told at the end of their 14 hour shift that they had to stay because everyone else (BRAVO who had the tough job of sitting in RJS all night their pajamas) were sent home.

    BTW, you cry about sleeping in your bed with your wooby and family and have the nerve to call him/her a PUZZY? Ok.

  7. #7
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Next time we should put SIMU on the Hurricane Hunter plane. The eye will become immediately disorganized.

  8. #8
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    No the original poster was dead on and asked a legitimate question. He/she most likely was one of the people stuck directing traffic during a 16 hour day shift and there were a lot of them. He/she probably saw all the people in hoochie shorts and flip flops going home after a rough night of lounging around RJS doing ABSOLUTELY FUKKING nothing for most of the deployment.

    Regardless of the bullzhit boilerplate emails from staff that are sure to come praising our readiness and performance this hurricane showed just how unorganized, unprepared and un FUKKING ethical some of our personnel are. I use the word personnel because it wasn't just officers but poor supervision and commanders as well. Some of you really shined from all levels top to bottom and trust me, people know who you are and greatly respect you. For you small lot Irma was a defining moment that let people know you perform under pressure and are willing to sacrifice to get things done. For the rest of you, hiding and dodging until you could cut out, you are a disgrace and just like the others you have also defined your career at TPD.

    The question asked was legit. Who gave the order to break down a full scale deployment the MORNING the hurricane hit and why? None of the damage to traffic signs and lights was even assessed yet and the radio was full of people going T7. While I agree with the above poster that the citizens have to follow the traffic laws that means absolutely nothing to those ALPHA units that were on at 0600 and told at the end of their 14 hour shift that they had to stay because everyone else (BRAVO who had the tough job of sitting in RJS all night their pajamas) were sent home.

    BTW, you cry about sleeping in your bed with your wooby and family and have the nerve to call him/her a PUZZY? Ok.
    You've got to be military to know what a woobie is!!! Lol

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