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PPD Explorer
06-26-2007, 01:14 AM
This is a topic I think everybody would like to discuss... me personal would like to get rid of this portion of states for the reasons i have stated in the ACTIVE SHOOTER topic

07-01-2007, 09:09 PM
You should know how to process a scene. I am a former explorer and current LEO. My agency has 24 hour Crime scene, but there is no point in me calling them out for a residential burglary that I can photo and print before they even get there. Yes thats their job, but what if you have one tied up on something you could handle, and a homicide occurs? That easily takes two or more CST's. Crimes scene is important and one of the basics in law enforcement. So open your mind and work with it.

How many active shooter calls occur state wide in a year?
How many crime scenes are there?

07-05-2007, 11:30 AM
I understand your point. However, the stuff covered in the crime scene is way too advanced. My post did well however, I still think that law enforcement officers do not need to know half of the crap we're judged on during the crime scene event. This type of event would give some crime scene investigators a run for their money, let alone explorers. Either make the crime scene one in which a police officer would be expected to handle or get rid of the event all together.

10-17-2007, 09:42 AM
As a 20 years veteran of Crime Scene, I have some advice to you, PPD Explorer. In reading some of your posts, I think you need to know this. Knowing what a crime scene tech does will help you, the officer who is the first unit on a scene, know what evidence needs to be preserved. I can't tell you how many scenes I've responded to and the OFFICER has contaminated it. I remember one scene where a drug store employee was tied up with duct tape. I respond to the scene and the officer is telling me what happened. While he's talking to me, he's holding a bunched up wad of something that looks like paper, in his hands, that he's tossing from hand to hand. I ask him, "What's that in your hand?" He tells me that its the duct tape that was used to tie up the employee! This officer didn't know that tape can be processed for fingerprints, and usually with good results. Being a cop is not just about chases and "real police work". Its about knowing what everyone in your department does, that will make you smarter in your job. Personally, I have solved many crimes with my forensic techniques, and I can't stress enough just how important it is to know what we do.

10-17-2007, 09:31 PM
Law Enforcement Explorer posts help youth to gain insight into a variety of programs that offer hands-on career activities. For young men and women who are interested in careers in the field of law enforcement, Exploring offers experiential learning with lots of fun-filled, hands-on activities that promote the growth and development of adolescent youth.

The above is a direct quote from BSA. So are you saying Crime Scene technicians are not part of law enforcement field? Law enforcement includes corrections, bailiffs, crime scene, dispatchers, and all the support personal, if you think itís getting into a cruiser and shooting people, your advisor has a poor job teaching you. If we go with your logic then lets get rid of first aid (let the EMTs do that) Lets get rid of traffic accidents (thatís for FHP) No more mountain bikes. (Thatís for communing Police officers) I think crime scene is one of the most important events at state. If you donít know what evidence is please do not get into law enforcement. Physical evidence is always better than eye witness testimony.

PPD Explorer
10-27-2007, 03:56 AM
im not saying that we don't need to know how to do a crime scene but the information that they covered in our state Comp. was way to advanced... I am comfortable in knowing that in what training in crime scene i have that i would not contaminate the scene but one of there direct quote of a question was " What chemical is used to find the lead particle tracings of a bullet ?" i had no idea.... A general knowledge of every part of the job is good but stuff like that we should not loose point for.

Thats what im saying

10-28-2007, 11:27 AM
So you are upset that you did not come in first place is the real issue,
Get over it move on. Pick another battle!!!!

10-28-2007, 11:32 AM
im not saying that we don't need to know how to do a crime scene but the information that they covered in our state Comp. was way to advanced... I am comfortable in knowing that in what training in crime scene i have that i would not contaminate the scene but one of there direct quote of a question was " What chemical is used to find the lead particle tracings of a bullet ?" i had no idea.... A general knowledge of every part of the job is good but stuff like that we should not loose point for.

Thats what im saying

That type of question is used in competitions to show the contestants that really know the field, versus those that don't. Sort of an eliminator question. Its not that you're required to know that, but if you do, if bumped up your points during the competition. Consider it a "brownie point" question. :D I'm sure if you prepped with your crime scene unit, then you did well. I've prepped many an Explorer over the years and they did just fine. The way you've commented on this section of the competition just made it sound like you didn't need to know the general information of forensic crime scene investigation and that you were above learning about it. My apologies if I misunderstood your posts.

PPD Explorer
11-03-2007, 02:49 PM
thanks...I know I need to get better at that event..